The Fujifilm mirrorless system provides a simple and easy way to get breathtaking panorama images.

When I switched over to the Fujifilm’s mirrorless system, I knew it had to be a system that would serve me creatively very well. This might sounds strange, but I love to be able to use my camera, very much as the tool to express what I see in my head, and it should make it easy to get there with too much struggle.

I have a fascination with vastness, and maybe it was me feeling a single frame shows to much of a great landscape in front of me, or it plainly being a function that would allow me to add more, so the viewer can see more.

I currently shoot with an X-T1 as we excitedly wait for the X-T2 to arrive, and when I found the Panorama function, it was close to finding out what you’re going to get for Christmas.

This excited me, but it pushed me finding interesting scenes to have this bigger, longer frame filled with. It has a stupendous way of stitching it virtually seamlessly, and it’s a bigger file that has so much digital info that it would print beautifully because of it keeping quality.

Like any good photographer, I have to travel with my gear, because there is always this fear that perhaps someday, you’ll get to the most perfect scene….and have no camera at hand.

So I do these, on my trips, and they are like special little jewels to me, and for certain something that I’ll find extra special place for on a wall, in my living space.

Handholding the camera, you can start your point on your left hand side, sweeping it in a line towards your right, and in seconds, your stitched image will appear – Panorama images have never been this easy to achieve.

My eyes are always looking up towards the skies, because active skies and amazing clouds, are what thrills me ever so much. The image with green fields, was a pouring day of rain in Cape Town, and this was just outside of Philadelphia, a small little town outside of the big city.

So you find them, and with a keen lookout, you can get chances for beautiful Panorama images, everywhere.

Yolandi Jacobsz, Loci Photography